Tag: GOP

Super Tuesday Results From Texas: It Ain’t Pretty

Ever since I was a little boy, I have always enjoyed math. It was always a treat solving equations and figuring out solutions based upon formulas. Regardless of the common core math fallacy, there are objective truths, and they can be found in the study of mathematics. I suppose that was why being a US Army Field Artillery officer was the perfect fit for me, figuring out firing solutions to put “steel on target.” Back in the day, we had to do our computations, under time constraints, with tabular firing tables and slide rules . . . those were the days.

Numbers tell a story when you know what to analyze, and they provide insight and the ability to develop plans and strategies. Therefore, our campaign staff for Texas GOP Chairman decided to take a look at some numbers from the Super Tuesday primary election here in the Lone Star State. We believed the results would tell us a story, but the story we uncovered is not a good one.

I think it is time those living in a delusional fantasy land stop kidding themselves, and realize that, well, yes, “Houston, we have a problem.” Now, I am not an alarmist, certainly not one to panic, but I am a realist. And, it is time we get real about what is happening, politically, in Texas.

It is, sad to say, a repeat of what the progressive socialist left has been doing in other once strong, conservative states.

The data found below comes from the Texas Secretary of State website. You can also see the results by county by party. This is all open-source data that anyone can find, research, analyze, and assess. What we did was to look at the major population centers in Texas, by county, and several surrounding counties, to provide a picture of what happened in this primary election cycle.

By comparison, we looked at three rural (lower population) counties. This is the data we found posted as of Thursday, March 5th. Here is what we found, with “us” meaning Republicans:

STATEWIDE (Texas) – updated 
D – votes cast – 2,076,046
R – votes cast – 2,008,385
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 68K
 
Harris (Houston) – registered voters 2,385,906
D – 321,903 votes cast 13.49% turnout
R – 192,985 votes cast 8.09%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 129k people 
 
Ft. Bend (West of Houston)  – registered voters 456,128
D – 69,540 votes cast 15.25% turnout
R – 57,212 votes cast 12.54%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 12K people 
 
Montgomery (North of Houston) – registered voters 347,703
D – 25,487 votes cast 7.33% turnout
R – 64,138 votes cast 18.45%  turnout
 
Galveston (South of Houston)  – registered voters 218,067
D – 22,044 votes cast 10.11% turnout
R – 28,250 votes cast 12.95%  turnout
 

Dallas (County) – registered voters 1,343,237

D – 231,688 votes cast 17.25% turnout
R – 83,304 votes cast 6.2%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 148k people 
 
Collin (North of Dallas) – registered voters 603,975
D – 84,350 votes cast 13.97% turnout
R – 68,909 votes cast 11.41%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 15K people 
 
Denton (North of Dallas) – registered voters 525,530
D – 67,092 votes cast 12.77% turnout
R – 66,621 votes cast 12.68% turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 500 people 
 
Ellis (South of Dallas) – registered voters 113,007
D – 9,701 votes cast 8.58% turnout
R – 22,481 votes cast 19.89% turnout
 
Tarrant (Ft Worth) – registered voters 1,160,856
D – 152,676 votes cast 13.15% turnout
R – 122,802 votes cast 10.58%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 30k people 
 
Parker (West of Ft. Worth) – registered voters 96,775
D – 5,292 votes cast 5.47% turnout
R – 24,277 votes cast 25.92%  turnout
 
Bexar (San Antonio) – registered voters 1,131,650
D – 170,762 votes cast 15.09% turnout
R – 80,785 votes cast 7.14%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 90k people 
 Travis (Austin) – registered voters 822,720
D – 223,233 votes cast 27.13% turnout
R – 42,043 votes cast 5.11%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 181k people 
 
Williamson (North of Austin) – registered voters 353,476
D – 60,677 votes cast 17.17% turnout
R – 43,868 votes cast 12.41%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 17K people 
 
Hays (South of Austin) – registered voters 142,166
D – 25,236 votes cast 17.75% turnout
R – 16,328 votes cast 11.49%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 9K people 

El Paso (County) – registered voters 471,296

D – 68,132 votes cast 14.46% turnout

R – 18,343 votes cast 3.89%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 40K people
 
Hidalgo (Rio Grande Valley, McAllen) – registered voters 379,061
D – 59,486 votes cast 15.69% turnout
R – 12,378 votes cast 3.27%  turnout
THEY OUT VOTED us by roughly 47K people 

The turnout percentage number is based upon the number of registered voters in those respective counties. What has to be rather disconcerting is the low voter turnout for Republicans overall, but especially in some very critical counties, such as where I reside, Dallas County…which saw a dismal 6.2 percent turnout.

We must increase voter enthusiasm, turnout...more than ever in major population centers. It's critical that Republicans are inspired, not just for the top of the ticket, but for the complete ballot. #Election2020 #SuperTuesday Click To Tweet

The first critical analysis from this data is that we must increase our voter enthusiasm, turnout. That has to occur more than ever in the major population centers. It is critical that Republicans are inspired, and not just for the top of the ticket, but for the complete ballot. That means voter education, and the development of ballot slates is vital. We can ill afford another bushwhacking, like in 2018 where the Texas Republicans lost 12 state house seats, and most importantly 56 judicial positions.

Yes, we must be concerned about the progressive socialist expansion from these major population centers. We can easily ascertain that their spread is in a particular direction. If you look at Houston — Harris County — you will find that the left is finding success to the west in Ft. Bend County. This is very important since there is an open congressional seat up for grabs there. We cannot continue to tout winning a Texas State House special election a few months ago, where the Republicans greatly outnumbered the Democrats.

Going into the November 2020 election cycle, it is imperative that we develop a political calculus to determine the precincts in these major population centers where we can grow numbers. This is not just about registering folks to vote! We gotta get them out to vote! 

Going into November, it's imperative we develop a political calculus to determine precincts in major population centers where we can grow numbers. It's not just about registering folks to vote! We gotta get them out to vote! Click To Tweet

Where can we gain those Independents and disaffected Democrats who do not wish to go down the path of the left’s ideological agenda? We must force the Democrats here in Texas to define what “turn Texas blue” means. We do not win on defense. It is time to go on offense. In essence, this is all about “micro-targeting” in these population centers, with definitive MOE (measures of effectiveness), goals, milestones, that we must hit . . . and that means careful management and constant updates.

If there is one thing for certain, it is that we must deliver our conservative message into the place where you find the greatest failure of leftist policies . . . the major cities. Just look at Austin.

Another staggering tidbit of information I never thought I would see in the Lone Star State, Bernie Sanders garnered over 633,000 votes and was the choice of Democrats in Denton, Bexar, Travis, Hays, and El Paso, just to name a few.

As well, that means finally, engaging, and sustaining, a policy relationship with the black and Hispanic communities. There is no reason why the Texas GOP should not have the Asian, namely the Vietnamese and Indian, communities solidly in our corner in the Lone Star State!

Further, it is time to roll up our sleeves and stand shoulder to shoulder with our Young Conservatives of Texas on these college and university campuses.

By a short comparison, let’s look at counties where I visited on Thursday, in the Texas Big Country. Abilene, Texas is in Jones and Taylor Counties

Jones – registered voters 9,287
D – 336 votes cast  – 3.62% turnout
R – 2,765 votes cast – 29.77% turnout
 
Taylor – registered voters 79,737
D – 4,824 votes cast – 6.05% turnout
R – 15,963 votes cast – 20.02% turnout
 
Coleman (County, south of Abilene) – registered voters 5,818
D – 163 votes cast 2.8% turnout
R – 2,354 votes cast 40.46% turnout

Folks, let me share a little something with y’all: when I shared this data in Abilene, they were shocked to hear some of these numbers. We must have an 80-100 percent turnout in our rural counties and that means East and West Texas. Nothing less will suffice, this is all hands on deck, “all in,” for Texas. If we have a massive turnout in our outer ring areas, regions, and then strategically focus — and, I mean like lasers — in the major population centers, we can pull off a resounding victory in November 2020!

However, if this is the trend, as these numbers suggest, then “Katie bar da door.” We must hold Texas, in order to hold America. Remember, mini-Mike is dumping $8M here to support anti-gun candidates running for the Texas State House in Dallas and Houston counties. I predict that Joe Biden will select a black female as his VP candidate. Sorry ol’ Bob Frank O’Rourke.

This is a fight, but we have all the right tools in our shed. We just gotta go for it, and, by God, show up!

Steadfast and Loyal!